Stacy G. Birmingham is dean for the Albert A. Hopeman, Jr., School of Science, Engineering and Mathematics at Grove City College, where she serves as chairman of the department of engineering and professor of mechanical engineering. Her areas of interest and research activity include: complex fluids, cell-surface interactions, and pedagogical issues at engineering teaching institutions. She holds a B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University.

Paper & panel title: “Science and Technology at the Heart of the American Experience”

William P. Birmingham is chair of the department of computer science and a professor of computer science and electrical engineering at Grove City College. He is also a fellow and working group coordinator for artificial intelligence and computer technology with The Center for Vision & Values. Birmingham has worked as an associate professor at the University of Michigan; co-founder, director, and project leader of Trimeter Technologies (in Pittsburgh, PA); and an AI engineer for the Carnegie Group (also in Pittsburgh). He holds a B.S.E.E., Masters in electrical engineering/computer engineering, and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University.

Paper & panel title: “Science and Technology at the Heart of the American Experience”

Craig E. Columbus is the executive director of the entrepreneurship program and chair of the department of entrepreneurship at Grove City College. He is also a fellow for entrepreneurship and innovation with The Center for Vision & Values. A former senior executive within the asset management, financial information, venture capital, digital media and broadcasting industries, Columbus has guided two start-ups from incubation to large-entity acquisition and integration. A frequent commentator on political economy, regulatory, and public policy issues, he has been a popular guest on CNBC television, appearing regularly on shows such as “Power Lunch,” the “Morning Call,” and “Kudlow and Company.” Columbus earned his B.A. from Loyola University, M.B.A. from Penn State University, and J.D. from Indiana University.

Panel topic: “The American Entrepreneur”

Michael L. Coulter is a professor of humanities and political science at Grove City College. His academic specialties are American government and political theory. A co-editor of the “Encyclopedia of Catholic Social Teaching, Social Science and Social Policy” (Scarecrow Press, 2007), Coulter has also has authored chapters for “Church-State Issues in America Today,” (Praeger, 2008), “Catholic Social Teaching: American Reflections on the Compendium” (Lexington Books, 2008), and has authored three entries for the five-volume “Encyclopedia of the Supreme Court of the United States” (Macmillan, 2008) in addition to contributing an entry to “Magill’s Survey of World Literature, Revised Edition” (Salem Press, 2009). Coulter graduated from Grove City College and holds both an M.A. and a Ph.D. in politics from the University of Dallas.

Panel topic: “Evangelicals and Tocqueville Together: An Assessment of 19th Century Religious America”
Paper topic: “Tocqueville on Exceptional Institutions and Exceptional Character”

Dinesh D’Souza is president of The King’s College in New York City and the author of many books. His latest bestseller is “The Roots of Obama’s Rage” (Regnery Press, 2010). His other books include: “What’s So Great About America” (Regnery Press, 2002), “What’s So Great About Christianity” (Regnery Press, 2007), “The End of Racism” (Free Press, 1995), and “Ronald Reagan: How an Ordinary Man Became an Extraordinary Leader” (Free Press, 1997). A former policy analyst in the Reagan White House, D’Souza also served as John M. Olin Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, and the Robert and Karen Rishwain Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Dartmouth College in 1983.

Debate topic: “America: Still Exceptional?”

Jason R. Edwards is an associate professor of education and history at Grove City College and the director of educational policy studies. He is a contributing scholar with The Center for Vision & Values and a member of both the ethics & character formation and educational policy working groups. The co-author of “Ask the Professor: What Freshmen Need to Know” (Greyhound Books, 2008), Edwards is a Lehrman Scholar and Salvatori Fellow for the Intercollegiate Studies Institute and has worked in partnership with Princeton University’s James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions. Edwards received a B.A. in history from Asbury College, his M.A. in history from the University of Kentucky, and his doctorate in history and philosophy of education from the University of Kentucky.

Lecture and paper topic: “We Want to be Cowboys, Baby!: The Significance of the Frontier Thesis in the Case for American Exceptionalism”
Paper topic: “A Letter to My Children: A Retrospective on Whittaker Chambers’ Famous Forward to Witness”

Lee Edwards is the Distinguished Fellow in Conservative Thought with the B. Kenneth Simon Center for American Studies at the Heritage Foundation. He is author or editor of 20 books, including “Freedom’s College: The History of Grove City College” (Regnery Publishing, 2000). An adjunct professor of politics at the Catholic University of America, he was the founding director of the Institute of Political Journalism at Georgetown University, a fellow at the Institute of Politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, past president of the Philadelphia Society, and a media fellow at the Hoover Institution. Edwards received a B.A. in English from Duke University, did graduate work at The Sorbonne in Paris, and earned his doctorate in world politics from the Catholic University of America. He also received an honorary doctoral degree in humane letters from Grove City College.

Lecture topic: “Bill Buckley’s America”

Marvin J. Folkertsma is chairman of the political science department, professor of political science, and director of the Washington internship program at Grove City College. A fellow for American studies with The Center for Vision & Values, he is also the author of several non-fiction and fiction books, including “Ideology and Leadership” (Prentice Hall, 1988) and a high-energy novel titled “The Thirteenth Commandment” (Glenbridge Publishing, 2004). His current projects include “The Temperaments of Politics,” “The Politics of Deliverance,” and international studies. Folkertsma received his B.A. from Calvin College and both his M.A. and Ph.D. from Wayne State University.

Paper topic: “Killing The Lone Ranger: American Exceptionalism and the Western”
Panel topic: “Those Thrilling Days of Yesteryear”

Robert P. George is the McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence and director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University. He has served on the President’s Council on Bioethics, as a presidential appointee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights, and was a former judicial fellow at the Supreme Court of the United States, where he received the Justice Tom C. Clark Award. A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, George is a recipient of the Presidential Citizens Medal and holds honorary doctorates of law, ethics, science, letters, civil law, humane letters, and juridical science. He received his A.B. from Swarthmore College, J.D. from Harvard University, and D.Phil from Oxford University.

Lecture topic: “Immigration and American Exceptionalism”

T. David Gordon is a professor of religion and Greek at Grove City College and author of “Why Johnny Can’t Preach: The Media Have Shaped the Messengers” (P&R Publishing, 2009). Gordon, whose academic specialty is New Testament, has contributed to a number of books and written numerous journal and magazine articles. Before he began teaching at Grove City College in 1999, he also taught at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary for 14 years, among other places, and was pastor of Christ Presbyterian Church in Nashua, NH, for nine years. Gordon received a B.L.A. from Roanoke College, a M.A.R. and Th.M. from Westminster Theological Seminary, and his Ph.D. from Union Theological Seminary.

Paper topic: “Taking Exception to American Exceptionalism”
Panel topic: “Exceptions to Exceptionalism”

Mark W. Graham is an assistant professor of history at Grove City College and author of “News and Frontier Consciousness in the Late Roman Empire” (University of Michigan Press, 2006). His academic specialty is late antiquity, a field which includes the late Roman Empire, early Medieval Europe, the rise of Islam, and the early Byzantine Empire. Graham received his B.A. from Bob Jones University, M.A. from the University of South Carolina, and a Ph.D. from Michigan State University.

Paper topic: “A Republic: Did We Keep It?”
Panel topic: “The Founders’ Republic”

Gillis J. Harp is a professor of history at Grove City College and member of the faith & politics working group with The Center for Vision & Values. He is the author of “Positivist Republic: Auguste Comte and the Reconstruction of American Liberalism, 1865-1920” (Penn State Press, 1995) and “Brahmin Prophet: Phillips Brooks and the Path of Liberal Protestantism” (Rowman & Littlefield, 2003). Dr. Harp has previously taught at McGill University and the University of Toronto, and is currently researching a book on the history of American conservatism. His academic specialty is American intellectual and cultural history, especially the nineteenth century. Harp earned his B.A. in history from Carleton University, and both his M.A. and Ph.D. in American history from the University of Virginia.

Paper topic: “‘There is no special providence for Americans:’ John Adams and American Exceptionalism”
Panel topic: “The Founders’ Republic”

Andrew J. Harvey is an associate professor of English at Grove City College and a contributing scholar with The Center for Vision & Values. Prior to coming to Grove City, he taught English at Eastern Mennonite University, University of Virginia College at Wise, and was a teaching fellow in the department of English at UNC Chapel Hill. His academic specialty is Medieval and Renaissance English Literature. Harvey received his B.A. from James Madison University, and both his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Paper topic: “The Last, Best Hope of Rhetoric, Reality and Reciprocity”
Panel topic: “From the Mountains to the Prairies”

Mark W. Hendrickson is a faculty member, economist, and contributing scholar with The Center for Vision & Values at Grove City College. The author of “America’s March Toward Communism” (Libertarian Press, 1987), he has taught at Westminster College and Allegheny College, in addition to publishing over one hundred articles on politics and economics. While serving as director of seminars at the Foundation for Economic Education in 1991, he created the “Fee Classics” series of books, editing the first two volumes of “The Morality of Capitalism” (Foundation for Economic Education, 1992). Dr. Hendrickson received his B.A. from Albion College with both his M.A. and Ph.D. from International University. He also studied law at the University of Michigan, literature at Oxford, moral education at Harvard, and economics under the tutelage of the renowned Austrian economist and legendary Grove City College professor Dr. Hans F. Sennholz.

Paper topic: “The Rise and Fall of American Economic Exceptionalism”
Panel topic: “Those Thrilling Days of Yesteryear”

Jeffrey M. Herbener is chair of the department of economics at Grove City College and a fellow for economic theory & policy with The Center for Vision & Values. He is also a senior fellow at the Ludwig Von Mises Institute, an associate editor of The Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics, director of the Austrian Student Scholars Conference, and has taught economics at Washington and Jefferson College. Herbener is editor of “The Meaning of Ludwig von Mises: Contributions in Economics, Sociology, Epistemology, and Political Philosophy” (Springer, 1992) and the author or editor of over one hundred articles in popular and scholarly venues including The Wall Street Journal, Investor’s Business Daily, and the Journal of Libertarian Studies. Herbener received his B.S. from Nebraska Wesleyan University and both his M.S. and Ph.D. from Oklahoma State University.

Panel topic: “The American Entrepreneur”

Richard G. Jewell is the eighth president of Grove City College. The Pittsburgh lawyer and businessman was a former director of the nation’s largest forensic accounting firm, Navigant Consulting. Prior to joining Navigant, Jewell was a senior administrator in applied research at the University of Pittsburgh, executive vice president of the University of Pittsburgh Trust, a member of the university’s senior management council, and president of the Pittsburgh Applied Research Corporation. He was first elected to the Grove City College board of trustees in 1974 and also holds faculty rank in the business department as professor of business law and public policy. Dr. Jewell graduated cum laude from Grove City College with high honors in political science and went on to graduate from the University of Michigan Law School with a Juris Doctor degree.

Lecture topic: “American Exceptionalism Through the Eyes of Teddy Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson”

Steven L. Jones is an assistant professor of sociology at Grove City College and a fellow for character & ethics with The Center for Vision & Values. He is also the coach of the College’s nationally recognized debate team and the director of the Koch Fellows program at the College. Prior to Grove City, he was associate director of the Pew Research Center on Religion and Democracy at the University of Virginia and a fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture. He has also received fellowships from the Center for Children, Families, and the Law and the Civitas Forum. Jones is the author of “Religious Schooling in America: Private Education and Public Life” (Praeger Press, 2008). He received his B.A. from Houston Baptist University, his M.T.S. from Duke University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia.

Paper topic: “All of Us are Exceptional, but Some of US are More Exceptional Than Others”
Panel topic: “Exceptions to Exceptionalism”

Paul C. Kemeny is an associate professor of religion and humanities at Grove City College and a fellow for character & ethics with The Center for Vision & Values. He is the author of “Princeton in the Nation’s Service: Religious Ideals and Educational Practice, 1868-1928,” Religion in America Series (Oxford University Press, 1998) and co-editor of “American Church History: A Reader” (Abingdon Press, 1998). His academic specialties are history of religion, American culture, and American higher education, and he is currently researching a book, “The First Moral Majority: The New England Watch and Ward Society and Moral Reform Politics in Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth-Century America,” in addition to serving as the editor of “Church, State, and Social Justice: Five Views.” Kemeny received his B.A. from Wake Forest University, his M.A.R. and M.Div. from Westminster Theological Seminary, a Th.M. from Duke University, and his Ph.D. from Princeton Theological Seminary.

Panel topic: “Evangelicals and Tocqueville Together: An Assessment of 19th Century Religious America”
Paper topic: “Evangelical Exceptions to American Exceptionalism: ‘Christian America’ and Evangelical Scholarly Dissent”
Paper topic: “Religious Toleration in American Public Life: An Evangelical Homily”

Paul Kengor is the executive director of The Center for Vision & Values and professor of political science at Grove City College. Known for his best-selling books, “God and Ronald Reagan” (ReganBooks, 2004), “The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism” (ReganBooks, 2006), and his latest, “Dupes: How America’s Adversaries Have Manipulated Progressives for a Century” (ISI Books, 2010). Kengor frequently appears as a political commentator on national radio and television. His other books include “God and George W. Bush” (ReganBooks, 2005), “The Judge: William P. Clark, Ronald Reagan’s Top Hand” (Ignatius Press, 2007), and “God and Hillary Clinton” (Harper, 2007). He received his master’s degree from American University and his doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh.

Paper topic: “Henry Luce and ‘The American Century’”
Paper topic: “Reagan and the Shining City”
Lecture topic: “The American Century: From Henry Luce to Ronald Reagan”

Michael Medved is a nationally syndicated radio talk show host, best-selling author, and veteran film critic. His daily three-hour broadcast reaches close to 5 million listeners on nearly 200 stations across the country—drawing an audience that consistently ranks his show as one of the top ten political talk shows in the United States. He is author of a dozen non-fiction books, including his recent New York Times extended bestseller: “The 10 Big Lies About America: Combating Destructive Distortions About Our Nation” (Crown Forum, 2008). He has been a frequent guest on all the major TV talk shows, including “Larry King Live,” “Nightline,” “Oprah,” “The Late Show with David Letterman,” “Good Morning America” and countless others. Medved graduated with honors from Yale University and then attended Yale Law School.

Lecture topic: “Does America face irreversible decline? Why claims about the inevitable doom of our great republic constitute one of The 10 Big Lies About America.”

H. Collin Messer is an associate professor of English at Grove City College. Previously, he was a visiting assistant professor of English at Calvin College, an assistant professor of English and annual faculty lecturer at King College, and a teaching fellow in the department of English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he won the Technology Award and the C.S. Herschel Course Development Award. Messer has also been a scholar at the National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar at Vanderbilt University. He received his B.A. in English literature from Emory University and both his M.A. and Ph.D. in English literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Panel topic: “From the Mountains to the Prairies”

Andrew Mitchell is an assistant professor of history at Grove City College. Prior to coming to Grove City, he taught at Hillsdale College and Spring Arbor University. Mitchell’s academic specialties are early modern Europe, military history, and Spanish history. He also studied in Spain under a Fulbright research fellowship. Mitchell received his B.A. in history from Hillsdale College and both his M.A. and Ph.D. in history from Ohio State University.

Paper topic: “Washington and Hamilton at Newburgh”
Panel topic: “From Washington to Eisenhower: From Isolation to Exporting Exceptionalism”

Joseph Pearce is the writer-in-residence and associate professor of literature at Ave Maria University. He previously taught at Ave Maria College in Michigan and is author of many books, the latest of which is, “Through Shakespeare’s Eyes” (Ignatius Press 2010). Mr. Pearce has published numerous books on the great intellectuals including J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Hilaire Belloc, G.K. Chesterton, Oscar Wilde, and Alexander Solzhenitsyn, to name but a few. Several of his books have won literary awards. He lectures widely around the United States and Europe on many topics and has published several articles. He is the co-editor of the St. Austin Review and the editor-in-chief of Sapientia Press.

Lecture topic: “One Nation Under God: An English American’s Perspective on American Exceptionalism”
Paper topic: “America: The European Perspective”

Gary Scott Smith chairs the history department at Grove City College and coordinates the humanities core. He is a fellow for faith & the presidency with The Center for Vision & Values, has published numerous articles in scholarly and popular journals, and has also penned chapters for several edited volumes on religion and society. In addition, he has authored or edited six books, including “Faith and the Presidency: From George Washington to George W. Bush” (Oxford University press, 2006). In 2000, he received Grove City College’s first Professor of the Year award, and the next year he was named Pennsylvania Professor of the Year by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. Smith earned a B.A. degree in psychology at Grove City College, a Master of Divinity degree at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary near Boston, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in American history at Johns Hopkins University.

Lecture & paper topic: “American Exceptionalism from John Winthrop to Barack Obama”

Samuel S. Stanton, Jr. is an associate professor of political science at Grove City College and author of “How Environmental Scarcity Contributes to Conflict: Statistical and Case Studies, 1985-2000” (Edwin Mellen Press, 2010). His research interests include: international conflict and security, national security, terrorism, human rights, and international environmental security. An academic fellow with the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, Stanton also served in the U.S. Air Force for six years and was a visiting assistant professor at both the University of Wisconsin (Stevens Point) and Eastern New Mexico University. He earned his B.A. and M.A. in political science from Arkansas State University, and his Ph.D. in political science from Texas Tech University.

Paper topic: “Do Americans Behave Exceptionally? The View of American Exceptionalism in Empirical Social Science”

John A. Sparks is dean of the Alva J. Calderwood School of Arts & Letters at Grove City College, where he teaches U.S. Constitutional history and business law, and was the former chairman of the business department. A fellow for educational policy with The Center for Vision & Values, he has been named an H.B. Earhart Foundation Fellow, an R.C. Hoiles Fellow, a Chavanne Fellow (Baylor University Hankamer School of Business), and has received the prestigious George Washington Honor Medal from the Freedoms Foundation, Valley Forge, Pa. He was named Professor of the year at both Hillsdale College (where he previously taught for seven years) and Grove City College (where he began teaching in 1976) and received the highest alumni award from his alma mater, the Jack Kennedy Memorial Achievement Award. Sparks is a graduate of Grove City College with a B.A. in economics and received his Juris Doctor degree from the University of Michigan Law School.

Opening session topic: “From Sea to Shining Sea: An Overview of American Exceptionalism”

L. John Van Til is a retired chair and professor of history, professor of business, and professor of humanities at Grove City College (1972-2004) where he has taught more than 20 courses. He is also a fellow for law & humanities at The Center for Vision & Values. He assisted in the development of Grove City College’s core curriculum, which is the forerunner to College’s required three-year Civilization Series, and has written more than 200 articles or essays on intellectual history, theology, philosophy, American history, and public policy, including some 80 position papers with the Public Policy Education Fund. Dr. Van Til is the author of “Liberty of Conscience” and editor of President Calvin Coolidge’s three volumes of writings.

Opening session topic: “From Sea to Shining Sea: An Overview of American Exceptionalism”
Paper topic: “American Exceptionalism: An Overview”

Jim Wallis is a bestselling author, public theologian, speaker, and international commentator on ethics and public life. Named to serve on the White House Advisory Council on Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, he is president and CEO of Sojourners. Wallis is also editor-in-chief of Sojourners magazine, which has a combined print and electronic media readership of more than 250,000 people. The author of ten books, his latest is “Rediscovering Values: On Wall Street, Main Street, and Your Street — A Moral Compass for the New Economy” (Howard Books, 2010). His two previous books, “The Great Awakening: Reviving Faith & Politics in a Post-Religious Right America” (HarperOne, 2008) and “God’s Politics: Why the Right Gets It Wrong and the Left Doesn’t Get It” (HarperSanFrancisco, 2005) were both New York Times bestsellers. Wallis attended Michigan State University and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and has taught a course at Harvard University on “Faith, Politics, and Society.”

Debate topic: “America: Still Exceptional?”

Jon David Wyneken is an associate professor of history at Grove City College. Prior to coming to Grove City, he received a year-long fellowship from the Baker Peace Studies Foundation and joined the faculty at Concordia University in Portland, Oregon. He has taught on European and world history, totalitarianism, the Holocaust, European film, issues in global diversity, and the history of baseball. Wyneken’s academic specialties include: modern Germany, international relations of the twentieth century, modern Russia/Soviet Union, and modern Asia. He received his bachelor’s degree in history from Humboldt State University, his master’s in American history from the University of Nebraska, and his Ph.D. in modern European history at Ohio University, where he was a graduate fellow with the Contemporary History Institute.

Paper topic: “There and Back Again: US-European Engagement and Blowback, 1945-55”
Panel topic: “From Washington to Eisenhower: From Isolation to Exporting Exceptionalism”